Official Reports

More information about Fiji is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed below:

  • Human Rights Country Report
    • Fiji – 2017 Report (133 KB) – Fiji is a constitutional republic. The country held general elections in 2014, which international observers deemed credible and “broadly reflected the will of the Fijian people.” Josaia Voreqe (Frank) Bainimarama’s Fiji First party won 32 of the 50 seats, and he was sworn in as prime minister.
    • Fiji – 2016 Report (PDF 149 KB) –  Fiji is a constitutional republic. The country held general elections, which the Australian-led Multi-national Observer Group deemed credible and “broadly reflected the will of the Fijian people,” in 2014. Josaia Voreqe (Frank) Bainimarama’s Fiji First party won 32 of the 50 seats, and he was sworn in as prime minister.
    • Kiribati – 2017 Report (PDF 77 KB) – Kiribati is a constitutional multiparty republic. The president exercises executive authority. Following legislative elections, the House of Assembly nominates at least three and no more than four presidential candidates from among its members, and the public selects the president for a four-year term. Observers considered parliamentary elections held in 2015 and January 2016 generally free and fair. Citizens elected Taneti Maamau president in March 2016. Observers considered this election free and fair.
    • Kiribati – 2016 Report (PDF 91 KB) –  Kiribati is a constitutional multiparty republic. The president exercises executive authority and is popularly elected for a four-year term. The legislative assembly nominates at least three, and no more than four, presidential candidates from among its members. Observers considered parliamentary elections held on December 30, 2015, and January 7, 2016, generally free and fair. Citizens elected Taneti Maamau president on March 9. Observers considered this election free and fair.
    • Nauru – 2017 Report (PDF 78 KB) – Nauru is a constitutional republic. International observers deemed the July 2016 parliamentary election to be free and fair. Parliament re-elected President Baron Waqa who was also a member of parliament.
    • Nauru – 2016 Report (PDF 88 KB) –  Nauru is a constitutional republic. International observers deemed free and fair the parliamentary election held July 9-11. Parliament re-elected President Baron Waqa who was also a member of parliament.
    • Tonga – 2017 Report (PDF 80 KB) – The Kingdom of Tonga is a constitutional monarchy. King Tupou VI, popularly elected parliamentary leaders, the nobility and their representatives, prominent commoners, and democratic reform figures dominated political life. The most recent parliamentary election occurred on November 16. Observers characterized the election as generally free and fair. On December 18, parliament re-elected Samuela ‘Akilisi Pohiva to serve as prime minister.
    • Tonga – 2016 Report (PDF 82 KB) – The Kingdom of Tonga is a constitutional monarchy. King Tupou VI succeeded his older brother in 2012, and was formally crowned in 2015. The king, popularly elected parliamentary leaders, the nobility and their representatives, prominent commoners, and democratic reform figures dominated political life. Parliamentary elections, which observers characterized as generally free and fair, were held in 2014, and in 2014 parliament elected long-time supporter of democratic reform Samiuela ‘Akilisi Pohiva as prime minister.
    • Tuvalu – 2017 Report (PDF 85 KB) – Tuvalu is a constitutional parliamentary democracy. The parliamentary election held in 2015 was generally free and fair, with three new members elected into the 15-member parliament. There were no formal political parties. Parliament selected Enele Sopoaga for a second term as prime minister.
    • Tuvalu – 2016 Report (PDF 80 KB) –  Tuvalu is a constitutional parliamentary democracy. The parliamentary election held in March 2015 was generally free and fair, with three new members elected into the 15-member parliament. There were no formal political parties. Parliament selected Enele Sopoaga for a second term as prime minister.
  • International Religious Freedom Report
    • Fiji – 2017 Report – The constitution establishes a secular state and protects freedom of religion, conscience, and belief. It also mandates the separation of religion and state. The constitution prohibits discrimination based on religious affiliation and inciting hatred or “disaffection” against any religious group.
    • Kiribati – 2017 Report – The constitution provides for freedom of religion. Religious groups with memberships equal to or greater than 2 percent of the population are required to register with the government. In July the president hosted a national dialogue with religious organizations to promote cooperation among the different churches and the protection of religious freedom in the country.
    • Nauru – 2017 Report – The constitution and other laws provide for freedom of conscience, thought, and religion, and freedom to change one’s religion or beliefs. Smaller churches continued to find the 750-member requirement for registration difficult to meet, although religious groups stated they could conduct most normal functions without registration.
    • Tonga – 2017 Report – The constitution grants freedom to practice, worship, and assemble for religious services. The law does not require registration of religious groups. A religious group, however, must register to be eligible for specific benefits such as recognition of clergy as marriage officers and tax exemptions.
    • Tuvalu – 2017 Report – The constitution provides for the freedom to change religion or belief and the freedom to show and spread religious belief through worship, teaching, observance, or practice. The law designates the Ekalesia A Kelisiano Tuvalu (the Congregational Christian Church of Tuvalu or EKT) as the state church and allows it to conduct “special services on major events.”
  • Trafficking in Persons Report
    • Fiji – 2014 Report – Fiji is a source country for women and children subjected to sex trafficking and forced labor, and a transit and destination country for Asian men and women subjected to forced labor and forced prostitution. Fijian women and children are trafficked abroad or in between cities for sexual exploitation and as domestic workers.
    • Kiribati – 2014 Report – Kiribati is a source country for girls subjected to sex trafficking within the country. Crew members, mainly South Korean men on foreign fishing vessels in Kiribati or in its territorial waters around Tarawa, exploit children. A local NGO has reported that as many as 50 I-Kiribati girls, some as young as 12, may be subjected to forced prostitution in local bars, hotels, and aboard vessels.
    • Tonga – 2014 Report – Tonga is a destination country for women subjected to sex trafficking and, to a lesser extent, a source country for women and children subjected to domestic sex trafficking and forced labor.